by Sara Pacelle

If you find yourself needing to enhance your resume with new or improved skills, you may want to consider taking an online course. 
I have found one website, lynda.com to be one of the best online learning sites to gain new skills and build on existing ones. Founded in 1995, lynda.com has an extensive library of video tutorials taught by some pretty impressive teachers  .lynda.com has particular strengths in online learning, particularly in the areas of graphic design, web development, software development and professional development.
 
According to their website,lynda.com is an online learning company that helps anyone learn software, design, and business skills to achieve their personal and professional goals. With a lynda.com subscription, members receive unlimited access to a vast library of high quality, current, and engaging video tutorials. New courses and topics are added every week at no extra cost. We carefully select the world’s top experts who are the best in their field, passionate about their subject matter, and know how to teach. Members tell us that a lynda.com subscription instills self-confidence and unlocks a sense of accomplishment that they have not found anywhere else.

You do have to pay for the coursework, but at $25/month, you can take as many courses as you would like and at times and location most convenient for you.


Do you recommend any other online learning sites?

Worth checking out.
 
 
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by Thomas Friedman, New York Times
This article originally appeared in the New York Times in February 2014.  Interesting to note that Google prefers using structured behavioral interviews to predict job candidate's future success.

 - Sara

LAST June, in an interview with Adam Bryant of The Times, Laszlo Bock, the senior vice president of people operations for Google — i.e., the guy in charge of hiring for one of the world’s most successful companies — noted that Google had determined that “G.P.A.’s are worthless as a criteria for hiring, and test scores are worthless. ... We found that they don’t predict anything.” He also noted that the “proportion of people without any college education at Google has increased over time” — now as high as 14 percent on some teams. At a time when many people are asking, “How’s my kid gonna get a job?” I thought it would be useful to visit Google and hear how Bock would answer.

Don’t get him wrong, Bock begins, “Good grades certainly don’t hurt.” Many jobs at Google require math, computing and coding skills, so if your good grades truly reflect skills in those areas that you can apply, it would be an advantage. But Google has its eyes on much more.

“There are five hiring attributes we have across the company,” explained Bock. “If it’s a technical role, we assess your coding ability, and half the roles in the company are technical roles. For every job, though, the No. 1 thing we look for is general cognitive ability, and it’s not I.Q. It’s learning ability. It’s the ability to process on the fly. It’s the ability to pull together disparate bits of information. We assess that using structured behavioral interviews that we validate to make sure they’re predictive.”